One "opinionated" girl in a huge world

You think this is a joke?

180,879 notes

ccushty:

punkgender:

one of the worst things about becoming educated on social issues is when people are like ‘you used to have a sense of humor’

no i used to have internalized prejudices which i’ve worked really hard to overcome and i realize now that your jokes are shitty

Always reblog this because becoming more socially aware makes you dislike a lot of people

(via maghrabiyya)

902 notes

thecoppercow:

bwwwssssshhhhhhhhh:

.

Usually in politics I tend to go by the saying ‘never attribute to malice what could just be incompetence’, but ATOS are genuinely the embodiment of pure, malicious evil. Here’s another choice set of tweets that illustrates just how callous IDS and ATOS and his winged monkeys are:

Sometimes you just want to sob with anger tbh.

thecoppercow:

bwwwssssshhhhhhhhh:

.

Usually in politics I tend to go by the saying ‘never attribute to malice what could just be incompetence’, but ATOS are genuinely the embodiment of pure, malicious evil. Here’s another choice set of tweets that illustrates just how callous IDS and ATOS and his winged monkeys are:

Sometimes you just want to sob with anger tbh.

(via blackcommunist)

61,595 notes

If I told you that a flower bloomed in a dark room, would you trust it?

Kendrick Lamar

This line encapsulates the concept of a good kid in a bad city, and it cuts into one of the most moral questions in human existence: Can good come from evil? The best part about the line, as is true of the best poetry, is that it doesn’t answer the question it asks. For Kendrick’s immediate purposes, he’s the flower and the city is the dark room. The question is: Can you trust him?

commovente

(via perfect)

(Source: navinkoke, via laughformebb)

0 notes

wagwan tumblr I’m actually surprised there’s still activity going on here it’s been so long like yeaaah

0 notes

I think it’s time to acknowledge that it’s been a whole 10 months and I still have a spending-money-on-shit-I-don’t-need addiction. I had £140 when I landed in this country almost 2 weeks ago. I now have £30. What the fuck did I spend it on?

  • 20z
  • Travel
  • Fabric softener
  • More e-cig cartomisers
  • 2 fucking prescriptions like legit when did they go up to £8.05?
  • I think I maybe bought pizza for me and R but I’m really not sure/can’t remember.
  • Coat hangers
  • Your mom’s chest hair
  • FFS WHY ISN’T EVERYTHING CHEAPER

I still have to pay for the dentist too like fuckin fabby.

0 notes

It’s times like these that I fully regret spending £15 on fabric softener.

0 notes

An irresponsible mumma that buys her bubus drugs and alcohol and tobacco and useless shit they don’t need but a mumma none-the-less.

0 notes

Like legit 2 of my friends have been paying for almost everything recently like “we have jobs so we can do this” and “you used to pay for everything when you had a job and we didn’t” and it’s like NO THAT’S NOT HOW THIS FUCKING WORKS I DID NOT FUCKING BUY YOU STUFF SO YOU COULD BUY ME STUFF I DID IT BECAUSE I AM THE ULTIMATE FUCKING MUMMA YA FEEL

0 notes

My friends are really getting on my nerves as well because they keep saying “let’s go out” or “let’s do something” but when I say I’m broke as fuck I literally mean I am broke as fuck like what is so fucking hard to grasp about that? It gets to the point where it’s not even nice to be thought of anymore and it just feels like it’s being rubbed in my face.

0 notes

Being unemployed is so shit.

I can go home from being bored at work and possibly have £1.20 for a k cider.

I’m unemployed and not entitled to job seekers, I literally cannot fucking escape.

I can’t go home from being unemployed because I’m constantly just stuck there.

3,465 notes

standwithfreeiran:

My Son Shahram Ahmadi has been sentenced to death. He is 26 years old and has spent the last 6 years of his life in prison. I couldn’t stop the execution of his younger brother Bahram and had a heart attack when I heard the news. The Iranian government refuses to hand over Bahram’s body. Now I need your help to stop Shahram’s execution.

Bahram is on the right and Shahram is on the left in the picture above. 
We are Sunni and Kurd. My son Shahram like many other Sunni youths has been critical of how badly the Iranian government treats the Sunni minority. Security police arrested him in April 2009 on his way home from mosque in our town, Sanandaj. They shot, beat, and kicked my son in the face, breaking his nose and head. They took him to the Intelligence Bureau of Sanandaj and subjected him to severe torture including electric shocks and forced him to falsely confess to armed resistance. It took the authorities 10 months before they allowed us to see him.
My son’s trial was unfair. The authorities kept him in detention for 4 years before charging him. The first time they allowed him to talk to his attorney was on the day of his trial. His trial lasted less than 10 minutes. Judge Mohammad Moghiseh used his coerced confession, the only evidence against him, to declare him a mohareb (enemy of God). I have no doubt that my son would have been found innocent if he had received a fair trial.
Your support could save my son. In the past international pressure has been instrumental in protecting individuals who had been unfairly prosecuted in Iran. A recent example is Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani who in 2006 was sentenced to stoning. Due to international pressure her sentence was later reduced to 10 years in prison and in March of this year, the Iranian judiciary announced that she has been released.
Shahram is not the only one at risk. Dozens of other Kurds have been unfairly sentenced to death. Please help me save my son and the other Kurds’ lives by asking Iranian officials to halt their executions and grant them fair trials.
Sign the petition. Pass it on.

standwithfreeiran:

My Son Shahram Ahmadi has been sentenced to death. He is 26 years old and has spent the last 6 years of his life in prison. I couldn’t stop the execution of his younger brother Bahram and had a heart attack when I heard the news. The Iranian government refuses to hand over Bahram’s body. Now I need your help to stop Shahram’s execution.

Bahram is on the right and Shahram is on the left in the picture above. 

We are Sunni and Kurd. My son Shahram like many other Sunni youths has been critical of how badly the Iranian government treats the Sunni minority. Security police arrested him in April 2009 on his way home from mosque in our town, Sanandaj. They shot, beat, and kicked my son in the face, breaking his nose and head. They took him to the Intelligence Bureau of Sanandaj and subjected him to severe torture including electric shocks and forced him to falsely confess to armed resistance. It took the authorities 10 months before they allowed us to see him.

My son’s trial was unfair. The authorities kept him in detention for 4 years before charging him. The first time they allowed him to talk to his attorney was on the day of his trial. His trial lasted less than 10 minutes. Judge Mohammad Moghiseh used his coerced confession, the only evidence against him, to declare him a mohareb (enemy of God). I have no doubt that my son would have been found innocent if he had received a fair trial.

Your support could save my son. In the past international pressure has been instrumental in protecting individuals who had been unfairly prosecuted in Iran. A recent example is Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani who in 2006 was sentenced to stoning. Due to international pressure her sentence was later reduced to 10 years in prison and in March of this year, the Iranian judiciary announced that she has been released.

Shahram is not the only one at risk. Dozens of other Kurds have been unfairly sentenced to death. Please help me save my son and the other Kurds’ lives by asking Iranian officials to halt their executions and grant them fair trials.

Sign the petition. Pass it on.

(via claudiomarchiisio)